Oct 312014
 

            Yesterday at the Newberry was definitely an interesting and informational day, as not only did I find some fascinating things in the Cowley papers at the library, but we had an interesting and engaging digital humanities speaker, Kyle Roberts, for our weekly Colloquium.

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 Posted by on October 31, 2014
Oct 302014
 

Women in computer science

NPR spent some time on the subject of the decline of women in computer science. Whereas the the percentage of women in other technical fields rose, the percentage of women in computer science declined, as shown in the chart above. Although it's tough to pinpoint a single factor, the time of decline coincides with when computer were mostly marketed towards boys in the 1980s.

In the 1990s, researcher Jane Margolis interviewed hundreds of computer science students at Carnegie Mellon University, which had one of the top programs in the country. She found that families were much more likely to buy computers for boys than for girls — even when their girls were really interested in computers.

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Oct 302014
 

Chess survival rates

On Quora, someone asked, "What are the chances of survival of individual chess pieces in average games?" Oliver Brennan answered by looking at the moves from 2.2 million games.

The situation with the c-d-e pawns is very interesting. The most survivable central pawn is the White c-pawn (42%), while White's d-pawn is the most doomed of all the chessmen (24%) - more so even than the knights (~26%). There's a pleasing symmetry in the survival rates of the White and Black c- and e-pawns that suggests they're frequently exchanged on the d-file. Bishops survive around 35% of the time, with the kingside bishops slightly more likely to survive than queenside ones.

Code available if you want to poke. [via Know More]

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Hello Folks

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Oct 302014
 

Hello,

I am excited and proud to be a HASTAC scholar and part of the broader HASTAC community. I applied to be a scholar because I am relatively new to thinking about the pedagogical applications of technologies and want to learn from all of you. The collective experiences and knowledge represented on this site is astounding. How very cool to be part of it.

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 Posted by on October 30, 2014
Oct 302014
 
Welcome to the sixteenth instalment of our popular Guess the Manuscript series. The rules are simple: we post an image of part of a manuscript that is on Digitised Manuscripts, you guess which one it's taken from! Are you as surprised as we are to find an umbrella in a...
Oct 302014
 

Immigration

Ipsos MORI, primarily a marketing research group I think, released results of their study on public perception of demographics versus reality, on numbers such as immigration, religion, and life expectancy. The key takeaway is that out of the people they polled from fourteen countries, the average person typically over- or underestimated — by a lot.

This grows to be an issue as officials form policies driven by public perception, which is a similar takeaway from the Gapminder Foundation's Ignorance Project.

The Ipsos MORI study also provides an index of ignorance, placing Italy at the top and the United States at number two. (Interestingly, Sweden, where the Gapminder Foundation is based, is last on the list i.e. lowest ignorance.)

Before you go nuts, remember not to take these ranking estimates too literally. Even though 500 to 1,000 people were surveyed for each country, I'd be curious to hear more about the sampling methodology. Was each country's sample really representative of the population?

I mean, based on the chart above, the average guess for immigration percentage in the United States is 32. So people thought a third of the country's population is from somewhere else? That seems high to me. Or maybe I'm just ignorant about ignorance. [via The Guardian]

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Oct 302014
 

Immigration

Ipsos MORI, primarily a marketing research group I think, released results of their study on public perception of demographics versus reality, on numbers such as immigration, religion, and life expectancy. The key takeaway is that out of the people they polled from fourteen countries, the average person typically over- or underestimated — by a lot.

This grows to be an issue as officials form policies driven by public perception, which is a similar takeaway from the Gapminder Foundation's Ignorance Project.

The Ipsos MORI study also provides an index of ignorance, placing Italy at the top and the United States at number two. (Interestingly, Sweden, where the Gapminder Foundation is based, is last on the list i.e. lowest ignorance.)

Before you go nuts, remember not to take these ranking estimates too literally. Even though 500 to 1,000 people were surveyed for each country, I'd be curious to hear more about the sampling methodology. Was each country's sample really representative of the population?

I mean, based on the chart above, the average guess for immigration percentage in the United States is 32. So people thought a third of the country's population is from somewhere else? That seems high to me. Or maybe I'm just ignorant about ignorance. [via The Guardian]

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Oct 302014
 

Many of us are working with visualization which is basically 2D (or maybe 3D perception). Until yesterday, I never knew the word "haptics" and "haptic technology" - creation of tactic feelings, such as touch, vibration etc. Stanford is offering a free self-pace course this fall that might be of interest not only to gamers but also to many DH projects related to virtual environment.

 Posted by on October 30, 2014