“Making a Better Web” Free, Public Talk, Lunch & Wikipedia Edit-a-thon with Dr. Constance Crompton

“Making a Better Web”

Free, Public Talk, Lunch & Wikipedia Edit-a-thon with Dr. Constance Crompton, University of Ottawa

October 22, 2018

 

To celebrate Open Access Week, Dr. Constance Crompton (University of Ottawa), 2017-18 Honorary Resident Wikipedian at the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL; etcl.uvic.ca) and the University of Victoria Libraries (libraries.uvic.ca), will give a free, public talk. “Donating and Developing: Contributing to Wikipedia to Make a Better Web” takes place on Monday October 22nd from 11am-12pm in the Digital Scholarship Commons, Mearns Centre for Learning, McPherson Library. Following the talk, participants are invited to learn how to edit the global, online encyclopedia Wikipedia in order to put their personal knowledge to work online.

 

Many still wonder whether Wikipedia is a legitimate source for finding information. Can a free, “amateur” encyclopedia be trusted? We think so. Wikipedia attracts 70,000 active contributors who work on 41,000,000 articles in 294 languages. Dr. Crompton speaks on the relationship between Wikipedia and academia and how it can be harnessed by academics to provide a well-researched, free resource to the public.

 

This event is free of charge and open to UVic students, staff, faculty, librarians, administrators, and the general public. Edit-a-thon participants are kindly asked to bring a laptop (laptops may be borrowed from Music & Media in the library) and to register via https://wiki2018.eventbrite.com.

 

Participants are welcome to bring their own material to contribute to Wikipedia, or else to draw resources from the UVic Libraries. Please let us know if there is a specific subject matter or artifact from Special Collections and University Archives that you would like to work with so that the archivists may have it on hand for you on the day of. We will also have some material from Special Collections on hand should you choose to work with it.

 

Abstract
“Donating and Developing: Contributing to Wikipedia to Make a Better Web”

Have you ever wished you could sit down with a computer to tell it how the world really works? The Wikimedia Foundation projects give you a way to do it. Whether you fix a typo in Wikipedia, help students and friends publish through Wikibooks, or add a few facts to Wikidata, you are giving computers the power of what you know to be important about history, culture, art, and literature. Tell it like it is — join us for the “Donating and Developing: Contributing to Wikipedia to Make a Better Web” lecture and edit-a-thon.

 

Bio
Dr. Constance Crompton is a Canada Research Chair in Digital Humanities in the Department of Communication at the University of Ottawa. She is also co-director, with Michelle Schwartz, of the Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada project, and a researcher with the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) Partnership. Dr. Crompton serves as the Vice-President English of the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities/Société canadienne des humanités numériques, Associate Director of the Digital Humanities Summer Institute, and Research Collaborator with The Yellow Nineties Online, housed at Ryerson University’s Centre for Digital Humanities. Dr. Crompton received a PhD in Communication and Culture from York University. Her research interests include digital humanities, queer history, Victorian visual and popular culture, prosopography, and code as a representative medium, and her work on these topics and others has appeared in a number of edited collections as well as the Victorian Review, Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies, Digital Humanities Quarterly, UBC Law Review, and Digital Studies/Le champ numérique.

 

Schedule – all events to take place in Digital Scholarship Commons

  • 11am-12pm, Dr. Constance Crompton talk, “Donating and Developing: Contributing to Wikipedia to Make a Better Web”; Introduction by Dr. Ray Siemens
  • 12pm-1pm, Lunch provided
  • 1pm-3.30pm, Wikipedia overview by Matt Huculak and Michael Radmacher, and edit-a-thon

 

The Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) and UVic Libraries are pleased to host Dr. Crompton as their 2017-18 Honorary Resident Wikipedian, a role that was previously held by Dr. Christian Vandendorpe from 2014–2016. This initiative is co-sponsored by the ETCL, UVic Libraries, Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) Partnership, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). Please direct any inquiries to the ETCL via Alyssa Arbuckle (<alyssaa@uvic.ca>), and / or to the UVic Libraries via Matt Huculak (huculak@uvic.ca>).

 

Registration, for lunch and Wikipedia edit-a-thon:

https://wiki2018.eventbrite.com.

 

Lorena Gauthereau Digital Dialogue

Archives and Digital Humanities (DH) projects that showcase minority voices can disrupt the mainstream perceptions of history and the literary canon; yet all too often, large-scale DH projects and archives reinforce Western epistemology and ontology. In response, some postcolonial and feminist scholars have approached DH from the margins of cultural and political life in order to encourage DH scholars to create and adopt methodologies that engage decolonial theory. Such methodologies consider how digital scholarship frames knowledge and knowledge-production. While national archives help to structure knowledge through a state-sanctioned narrative, decolonial DH methodologies seek to address the silences not only in digital scholarship, but also in the official archive.

Drawing on Women of Color (WOC) theory such as Chela Sandoval’s Methodology of the Oppressed (2000), I discuss the digital implications and applications of “oppositional consciousness” and Affect theory. In this talk, I focus on the emerging US Latina/o Digital Humanities initiative at the Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage project (aka “Recovery”) in order to examine structural colonial problems encountered in US Latina/o DH and the stakes of digital decolonial praxis.

The post Lorena Gauthereau Digital Dialogue appeared first on Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities.

In Production

I sat down this afternoon to force myself to write a blog post, as I haven’t been doing much in the way of writing of late, and am feeling a bit cramped because of it.

Or perhaps it’s more fair to say that I haven’t been doing much in the way of writing of the new-project kind of late, because I have in fact been writing non-stop: grant proposals, letters of recommendation, and email email email. None of that ever actually feels as though it counts, though, and I feel not-so-vaguely guilty whenever I check off the daily writing item in my to-do app and the writing has been of a predominantly administrative nature.

But what I have been working on is the wrap-up of my last project, which never feels quite like it ought to count, either, and yet requires revisiting the manuscript with just as much intensity as the actual writing of it demanded. I spent a weeks with the copy edits, wrestling through what I’d actually meant to say and how it got read (very generously, I’m happy to say) and making sure that I was happy with where things wound up.

The next stage of my involvement with the project will be the final proofread, and then… the anxious awaiting of this gorgeous thing, whose 2-dimensional version landed in my inbox just as I was pondering what to write about.

I’m beyond happy about this, and hope you will be too. Coming to a bookstore near you in 2019.

Two new charters from Ramsey Abbey

In 2017, we were delighted to receive the gift of two 12th-century charters from Ramsey Abbey, generously donated to the British Library by Abbey College, Ramsey. These two charters have been conserved and photographed, and they can now be viewed on our Digitised Manuscripts site. The charters were presented on...

Grants Coordinator (Contract)

Jobs and Fellowships
Hours: 20 hrs/week Duration: 6 months with possible extension Location: San Francisco, CA Summary The Community Resources team distributes funds and other resources via several participatory grantmaking programs, aimed at supporting mission-aligned organizations, groups, and individuals around the...
United States